A little chat

This is an Interview I did with Sophie, an amazing woman who took last years Teacher Training with me here in Bali. She is an inspiring human, who is not only a former language and art student but also a medical doctor as well as she has her own blog. For this blog, we did an Interview and I was truly inspired by her relevant, curious and deep questions. 

 To read the Interview, visit Sophie´s Website here: https://www.yoga-and-you.com/

 

A little chat with yogi Meghan Currie…

 

Some humans are just a tiny bit more out of this world, a gift to others, to inspire and guide, and Meghan Currie is definitely one of these.

 

I knew Meghan from her mesmerizing and creative practices on social media, so when I got the chance to attend teacher training with her I didn’t hesitate. I can reassure you that she is just as captivating in real life: authentic, playful, poetic, kind and a master of body movement. I am still excited that she took the time to answer some of my questions and that I can share her answers today with you…

 

 

 

When does a body shape become Yoga?

 

Meghan: Hmm.. When awareness begins to infuse in with breath, so consciousness, awareness, and listening emerge.

 

If you are one of the million viewers who has seen the video „mad love“ on YouTube you’ll agree that when Meghan flows it feels like she was born moving like this. How easy did so called „advanced poses“ like handstand and splits come to her?

 

I was practicing gymnastics at a very young age - even though I don’t think I could ever hold a handstand - there was some muscle memory in me. So, I had the flexibility but I didn’t have a lot of strength. I had to build all the strength, which wasn’t easy, it took a lot of discipline and hard work.

 

I think what fueled my practice was that I was suffering with anxiety and depression… the discipline to practice came from forces within me that were crippling in a sense. I was in so much pain, and to get away from the pain I channeled it into yoga. It was a way for me to get out of the anxiety and get out of the depression. This is what has helped me to generate a strong disciplined practice that now looks fluid and easy and has at the same time healed me.

 

 

 

When Meghan was guiding us through Teacher Training she got up every morning at four a.m. for her own practice before starting to teach us at seven. Personally, I find it very hard to practice by myself, I am in a constant fight between pushing myself too little or then being so strict that I’m not enjoying the practice. Here are Meghan’s thoughts on how to balance these two forces within oneself:

 

The reason why the laziness happens is because activation sometimes can feel uncomfortable. On the other hand, if the pressure comes in and you feel like you have to, or you should, it completely cripples our ability to just flow. So we all need a different quantity of disciplined effort.

 

Me, for example, in my late teenage years, I was so lazy. I didn’t want to do anything, I didn’t want to move, I didn’t like the feeling in my legs when I was climbing stairs. I had so much dormancy in my body because I had spent so much time out of my body. What I needed was to activate and I still need it. I need to sit in a goddess pose until my legs burn, in order for me to come into my body. I wouldn’t say that is what every person needs, but one needs to find out what quantity of disciplined effort they need in order to be able to access this floating state.

 

Unfortunately, it is not like a formula. Some people don’t mind that feeling in their legs but they hate it in their shoulders, their heart, their throat or in their belly… we are all so different. We need to find the space where it feels good, we need to find the reward-feedback loop. But we need to redefine what „feel good“ is too. If we are activating something that feels intense, there can be an eruption of discomfort and one's pattern could be to want to avoid that. So it is not „the good“ that maybe the old mind thinks it is. The old mind, that just wants to lay around. And it is not „the good„ that the mind that has expectations has idealized, it is that place in the center which we all need to discover for our selves.

 

Once found, we have to work with it, moment to moment to moment. For me, it does mean lying down sometimes now. And it also means doing a lot of leg things just to keep in my body. Even though I have a weekly routine, it changes for me too from week to week. It is never just that one recipe.

 

With over 200’000 followers on social media, Meghan is a famous yogi. During our classes, she warned us that the meaning of Yoga can get twisted if it is all about the social media. She advised us to avoid comparing and looking at others account but to share from our heart and truth. When asked whether social media was some kind of love-hate relationship for her, she answered:

 

I appreciate social media and I am grateful for it, but I know when to take a break. Social media is also a good teacher. It shows me different ways that I am stuck or that I am holding myself back, it shows me ways I am scared, ways I don’t believe in myself, where I have old belief patterns, it shows me different aspects of my ego and it has shown me ways in which I had been relying on this feedback to feel good. So it has shown me a lot of things and it still continues to show me where I am at right now.

 

The challenge for me is to share more, more authentically and more and more from a real place and to just keep digging my capacity for public vulnerability. So I wouldn’t say that I love it or that I hate it, I would say that it is a good teacher for me in so many different ways. It shows me all the different corners inside of me, based on how I get triggered or inspired by what I see outside of me.

 

 

 

 

Meghan is not only a gifted yogi, she is also a poet (read her captions on Instagram), artist and musician. During teacher training, we were lucky to get the chance to be the first ones to see and buy her beautiful clothing line isabellemoon. Soon it will be available to the public, and this is the story behind it:

 

When I was twelve, I wanted to learn how to sew, so my mom taught me. I wasn’t really good at it and it was kind of frustrating but I kept trying, trying, trying, trying… and then eventually got good at it and started to make dresses. Later I saved up all my money from working at the market, so that I could buy a serger, this is the machine that does the finishing stitch. It was one of the most exciting things I ever bought, and every moment I had free I spent sewing. I was sewing kind of asian inspired smoking jackets. They were like kimonos but more masculine, with ties and pockets in the front. And I was making sixties inspired hippie-dresses and bell buttons. I took over my moms basement, covered everything in fabric and made a whole line of clothing which my friends bought. Later I made a clothing line which I sold at a little store called „the eye in the sky“ that was near where I lived. When I moved to Vancouver I brought my sewing machine with me and I made a different line of clothing that was called „lamp“. Because it was inspired by lamps: it was all dresses that looked like lamps with tassels on the bottom… That is where it all began. And from that moment on my whole teenage years and into my twenties I always had a sewing machine.

 

But when I started traveling to teach yoga, I didn’t sew for five years. Then, when I settled in Bali over a year ago, it just happened. I wanted to make a clothing line, a friend found the tailer and in one year I made the whole line of what you see…

It was many years in the making in my head, it took that long to be ready to blossom and in the moment it was, it happened so easily… I really believe that is how things work sometimes. In our lives we have those visions, we cultivate them and we keep working with them, keep practicing different aspects of them and then one day there are just ready to bloom …..

 

Read More:

read more